How Can You Work in Greater Montréal During and After Your Studies?

Getting professional experience is the best way to integrate. From the moment you begin your studies, you can familiarize yourself with the labour market,  through internships or student jobs.

Here we list some useful information about working while you’re studying and after you’ve completed your education.

Can I Work With a Study Permit?

During your studies, you can work on campus or off campus for up to 20 hours per week during the course of your studies without applying for a work permit. You can even work full-time during your vacation and on scheduled holidays. In either case, you need a valid study permit and must be registered as a full-time student.

After I Graduate, Which Permit do I Need to Work on a Temporary Basis?

Once you receive official confirmation from your educational institution that you have successfully completed your program of study, you then have 90 days to apply for a post-graduation work permit from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada. But note that this permit is temporary. It is only valid for a period equivalent to that of your studies, or up to three years. A valid study permit is required at the time of application.

Permanent Residency: Working and Staying Over the Long-Term

If you are planning to settle in Greater Montréal, it is best to apply to become a permanent resident of Canada earlier rather than later. As soon as you are a permanent resident, you can work without any restrictions.

To become a permanent resident, you must first obtain a Québec selection certificate (CSQ) from the Ministère de l’Immigration, de la Francisation et de l’Intégration (MIFI) of Québec. If you meet the required criteria, the Québec experience program (PEQ) generally allows you to obtain the CSQ within one month. If you are not admissible to the PEQ, check out your eligibilty for the Regular program – Foreign student in Québec (PRTQ).

Volunteering and Networking: Enhancing Your Professional Integration

Volunteering is a rewarding activity that allows you to get involved and build a network. Plus, Greater Montréal is not without need. For example, the Volunteer Bureau of Montreal lists more than 600 volunteer activities.

Professional networking is also an essential activity to facilitate the transition to the labour market. Many sites like Montréal5A7 keep you informed about networking events.

An international student in Canada can work on campus and off campus for up to 20 hours per week during regular study sessions.
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